fbpx New Resource Library Page | CBE

Welcome to CBE’s Library

Tip: to find an exact phrase or title, enclose it in quotation marks.

Patriarchal beliefs in American evangelicalism regarding women and men’s roles are pervasive—even in egalitarian churches. This helps explain the exodus that begins when a woman enters a church as pastor.

KEEP READING

After decades of struggling to accept “her place” followed by learning what the Bible truly says about how women can lead, Julie discovered it wasn’t too late to embrace God’s call for her to preach.

KEEP READING

The story of Gideon helps us understand why there aren’t more women in ministry. When God called Gideon, he was reluctant and anxious and in hiding—and a mighty warrior.

KEEP READING

Jesus had female disciples, and there’s a reason they weren’t included in “The Twelve.” Hint: it wasn’t because Jesus didn’t approve of women as church leaders.

KEEP READING

Before women can be equally represented in church leadership—especially as pastors and especially at egalitarian churches—they need more time, outside affirmation of their calling, and an opportunity to heal.

KEEP READING

In his response to a question posed by the Sadducees, Jesus said that those in the resurrection "neither marry nor are given in marriage." The reason women will not be "given in marriage" is that, in the resurrection, they will not be viewed as property.

KEEP READING

Amid the patriarchy of the ancient world, early Christianity had a particularly liberating and redemptive place for women, one significant enough to be mentioned by Christianity’s first major critic, the second-century philosopher Celsus.

KEEP READING

This issue is particularly diverse. Its authors are from all around the world, represent various denominations and professions, and write on a wide range of topics.

KEEP READING

Emilienne Loubota was an uncommon hero and a foremother to the women pastors in the Evangelical Church of Congo.

KEEP READING